the blog of dan pontefract | So The LMS Is Dead: Collaboration-Talent Convergence is Next
519
single,single-post,postid-519,single-format-standard,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.0,vc_responsive

So The LMS Is Dead: Collaboration-Talent Convergence is Next

When I read recent news that Taleo had purchased Learn.com, to be honest, I was pleasantly surprised. (and not just for my buddy Dave Wilkins)

No, not because I’ve been yapping about the need for the Standalone LMS to go the way of the dinosaur and thus feeling a sense of vindication, but for a new reason.

There is a new showdown upon us.

Talent Management versus Collaboration Systems.

Now that the Standalone LMS domino is falling, we can now turn our attention to the looming next battle which, in my opinion, will be between Talent Management Systems and Collaboration Systems. (links are to Wikipedia entries)

Maybe I’m off my nearly 40 year-old rocker, but to have separate Talent Management and Collaboration Systems in an organization seems as silly as a standalone LMS. As silly as England ever winning another World Cup.

Think about the example of Rypple for a moment. Albeit a SaaS model, Rypple demonstrates how concepts of Talent Management and Collaboration are already merging, in this case, as a form of feedback and/or performance development for your employee base.

Collaboration tools, applications and systems are inherently better ways in which to drive a flatter and more connected culture within your organization. But, to truly gain traction, the ‘human capital’ processes found within the ‘talent management’ space (such as performance reviews, learning management, onboarding/induction, succession planning, retention and attraction practices, compensation protocols, etc.) really need to have collaboration practices built into it.

In summary, now that the learning management system is being woven into talent management systems (or in some cases with collaboration systems), is it time for players such as Atlassian, Jive, Liferay, SocialText, etc. to begin merging with the likes of SuccessFactors, Taleo, Halogen, etc.

Or, how do the likes of Microsoft, Google, Cisco, SAP, Oracle etc. play a part in what arguably could be labeled as the ‘Talent & Collaboration Convergence’? (see Oliver Marks recent entry as well)

We shall see.

5Comments

  • Jon Husband / 7 September 2010 10:38

    But, to truly gain traction, the ‘human capital’ processes found within the ‘talent management’ space (such as performance reviews, learning management, onboarding/induction, succession planning, retention and attraction practices, compensation protocols, etc.) really need to have collaboration practices built into it.

    Yes, and …

    Most of the functional aspects of Talent Mgt that you have described above are derived from or related to job descriptions and org’nl ‘structure’ that have yet to be substantively addressed in terms of the changes need to enable / support / reinforce a connected-and-collaborative work environment (yes, I know (or believe) you and your colleagues have done some thinking and / or work in this respect, but there’s many aspects of this ‘framework’ that offer significant potential for dissonance.

    I also know this is a niggling point, but I’d prefer to grow, attract and celebrate the effective use of talent (and yes, I’d include a succession plan) rather than ‘manage’ it, in an increasingly difficult-to-predict world.

    There are applications / web services coming along that will help in this regard, I believe.

  • Richard Harbridge / 8 September 2010 9:58

    I think there is already some convergence in this area: Collaboration and Talent Management especially in relation to simple things like expertise search, and social features now available in collaborative environments. (I can talk at length about this in the SharePoint space.)

    Take simple systems that deal with employee file management or those processes mentioned above – I know of hundreds of organizations who currently use collaboration, content management, and business process management systems to support all employee (and talent) related processes.

    The difficulty in part is that historically collaboration technologies and their adoption is driven from IT where as Talent Management is driven from HR. As these groups adopt each others platforms (or the technology stretches out using new features/capabilities like social) the boundary lines will diminish and you will see the convergence you, I and many others want to see happen. 🙂

  • Richard Harbridge / 8 September 2010 10:00

    P.S – Of the last 10 projects I did relating to HR or people development and training all of them touched upon Talent Management and all of them utilized SharePoint which is not a ‘proper’ talent management system.

  • Emerging Trends in the LMS and Talent Management (2012 Learn@Work Week) | Learning Lately / 27 September 2012 9:15

    […] Good blog post by Dan Pontefract (@dpontefract) two years ago on this trend of LMS and Talent converging, and why it’s a good thing. http://www.danpontefract.com/so-the-lms-is-dead-collaboration-talent-convergence-is-next/ […]

  • Adrius42 / 6 September 2013 1:44

    The answer is simple, yet it will take a whie. We shift from an Enterprise Centric view of the value of talent, towards a perspective that balances the individual and societal needs and benefits . Put the Talent at the centre of the architectural frame and maximize for individual and societal benefit. This will recreate a world we left behind where the skills of individuals are recognized and rewarded not the folks who make money from them. Case in Point: ‘s got Talent is not making the contestants rich.

Want to leave a comment? I'd love to hear from you. Cheers, dp.