the blog of dan pontefract | Remembrance Day: How Learning 2.0 Can Assist
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Remembrance Day: How Learning 2.0 Can Assist

In Canada, and for that matter many Commonwealth countries, Remembrance Day is celebrated on November 11.

It’s a day whereby we recognize and thus remember the sacrifices that civilians, armed forces members and families have made for peace.

Remembrance Day was first observed in 1919 to denote the end of World War I, which occurred on the 11th hour, of the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918. At the time, newspapers, radio and teachers/professors helped to spread the word of the day.

Now, some 90 years later, we have lost all remaining soldiers & participants of World War I and will, eventually, lose all remaining soldiers and participants of World War II. (of course, there are other conflicts we recognize as well such as the Korean War, Gulf War, Afghanistan, etc.)

The concerning question for me is how might we utilize Learning 2.0 components to ensure we’re educating the current and next generations of the sacrifices and situations of yesteryear such that Remembrance Day is not merely an event, but a learning experience itself?

There is a great example of what I would argue to be ‘progress’ with Learning 2.0 type of thinking over at Veterans Affairs in Canada. It’s a site entitled “How Will You Remember”.

It’s just plain awesome. I felt compelled to write about it, and thus to promote it.

The site has a discussion forum, link posting, YouTube Channel, Facebook Site, FeedStream, Mobile App download, and so on.

If you’re an educator or a parent, whether you’re Canadian, European, American, Asian, whatever … I encourage you to visit the site and share with your children, your nephews/nieces, your neighbours, whomever … not just because it’s a good example of Learning 2.0 in action, but because we just ought to be.

We need to relate concepts like Remembrance Day to the societal changes of 2010, and this site does a fabulous job.

The only thing missing for me would be to ensure we’re capturing the voices of those that have served. We need to collect those moments of intellectual property, through collective intelligence itself, and then preserve and share for others to learn from.

In Flanders Fields

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